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Frequently Asked Questions

Click on the question marks to view the answers online. Or, if you prefer, click here to download this information in Adobe .pdf format. You may also download sample reports in this format.

Question Mark Why should our fitness center administer fitness tests?

Question Mark Why should we assess a participantís current fitness?

Question Mark Why measure fitness improvement over time?

Question Mark Which fitness tests should we administer?

Question Mark How often should we administer fitness tests?

Question Mark What if we want to administer a test that the software doesnít include?

Question Mark What if we design our own test and want to assess participantsí scores, but being a new test, there are no norms established yet to use in determining assessments?

Question Mark What does the word "Weight?" mean when it appears beside a test result on the Fitness Profile in the column marked "Assessment"?

Question Mark How can we prevent a participantís ID number from showing on the screen when they log in, so other participants canít see their ID number?

Question Mark Does it matter in what order the fitness tests are given?

Question Mark Do the fitness tests have to be defined in the software in the same order as the tests are given?






Why should our fitness center administer fitness tests?

There are two basic reasons for administering fitness tests:

  1. Assessing a participantís current fitness.
  2. Measuring fitness improvement over time.


Why should we assess a participantís current fitness?

  1. You can screen participants to determine who should see a doctor and get a medical clearance before beginning a conditioning program. This is not only of benefit to the participant, but also protects you and your facility from possible future liability.


  2. It isolates each personís strength and weaknesses so you can offer better personalized advice to each participant for improving those areas that need improvement. Once you enter the results of the fitness tests into the software, the participantís Fitness Profile Report indicates which fitness components have weaknesses that need to be addressed.


Why measure fitness improvement over time?

  1. Unless you measure each participantís fitness component scores when they start and periodically thereafter, you will never know if that participant has improved because of your program.


  2. With the Red Canyon Systems software program, you can print the Individual Fitness Test Comparison Report for each participant. This report shows for each fitness component, the amount of improvement that has occurred between test dates. You can use this report to validate that working out in your center has been successful for the participant. The report is sometimes referred to as a "report card" is an excellent means of motivating the participant to continue working out.


  3. In addition to the report that shows individual participants their improvements, the software can print a Group Comparison Report. It shows how much the entire membership or selected groups have improved over a period of time. You can use this information to evaluate the success of your center overall and statistically validate to others - prospective members, board of trustees, department heads - that the center is successful at improving participant fitness.

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Which fitness tests should we administer?

At a minimum, you should administer at least one test each for the five basic fitness components:

Body Composition
ratio of fat, bone, and lean muscle mass
Cardiovascular
efficiency of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems
Strength
amount of weight a muscle can lift
Endurance
muscleís ability to repeat a task
Flexibility
body partís range of motion or ability to stretch

Each fitness component has various tests that can be administered and assessed. The nine most-common tests are:

Body Composition
  1. Weight
  2. Body Fat % - via skin fold or electrical impedance machine
Cardiovascular
  1. Resting Pulse
  2. Blood Pressure
  3. Step Test
Strength
  1. One Repetition Max Lift of an upper body exercise, such as bench press
  2. One Repetition Max Lift of a lower body exercise, such as seated leg press
Endurance
  1. Number of curl-ups or sit-ups that can be performed in one minute
Flexibility
  1. Sit and reach for hip flexibility

The above 9 fitness tests are easily administered in the field and offer a fairly comprehensive assessment of a participantís overall fitness.

Most participants are not only concerned about their fitness, but also their appearance. These participants will be looking for an assessment of changes in their physical appearance. The following measurements are recommended as part of the fitness test battery. Reports show the amount of improvement for the following body parts:

  • Waist
  • Hips
  • Thigh

Some participants may want to measure change in biceps, calves, and chest. You can define other areas for which improvement is to be tracked. We recommend that you administer the 9 fitness component tests listed above, the three body measurements of waist, hips and thigh, and measure height. An adultís height changes little, if any, over time. However, height for younger participants does change. Height is used in different formulas measuring fitness, such as the Body Mass Index (BMI), a ratio of height to weight.

The recommended basic fitness tests are:

  • Weight
  • Resting Pulse
  • Step Test
  • One RM leg press
  • Height
  • Hips
 
  • Body fat
  • Blood Pressure
  • One RM Bench Press
  • Sit ups per minute
  • Waist
  • Thigh
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How often should we administer fitness tests?

As often as you want to measure improvement. Normally, you should allot enough time between tests for improvement to occur. In the case of school fitness centers, testing at the start and end of each school term are natural times to test. This time frame allows for measurable improvement between tests.

Other sites may want to test participants after a specified amount of time - 3 months, 4 months, 6 months. Some sites test participants after the participant as made a specific number of visits to the center since the last test date. In each of these cases, the software and print a list of participants who are due for testing.



What if we want to administer a test that the software doesnít include?

If you develop a test of your own, or find an existing test youíd like to use that is not listed in the softwareís fitness test master list, contact us. We will add the test to the softwareís master test file and send you the new file. You can then add the test to your site test list and begin recording participantsí results for the test.

If you have norms for the test that you want added, send them to us. We will add the norms to the software so the fitness profile can provide members with assessments of their scores for the new test.



What if we design our own test and want to assess participantsí scores, but being a new test, there are no norms established yet to use in determining assessments?

Initially, you wonít be able to provide members with assessments of the results of that test, since there are no norms yet to compare the results to. However, after you have administered and recorded in the software the results of a sufficient number of this new test, you can send an electronic copy of the test results to us - either via floppy disk or in an e-mail attachment.

We will analyze the results and develop norms tables from them. We will then send you a new file with norms tables to add to our software program. Our software can then assess all prior and future results of that test using the norm tables based on your own sites test results.


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What does the word "Weight?" mean when it appears beside a test result on the Fitness Profile in the column marked "Assessment"?

This happens when the fitness profile is trying to print out an assessment for a fitness test that requires a memberís body weight and no body weight has been entered in their fitness test. This can occur in the One Rep Max lift tests. For theses tests a participantís lift weight is divided by their body weight. The software compares the result to the norm table. If you do not use weight as a test for your site or you have not entered the participantís weight in the fitness test, the assessment cannot be done. In this case, you will need to return to the memberís fitness test, enter a body weight, and reprint the report. The assessment should then appear on the report.



How can we prevent a participantís ID number from showing on the screen when they log in, so other participants canít see their ID number?

  1. Click Set Up on the Main Menu


  2. Click Log In SetUp on the Set Up Form


  3. On the left column is an item called Log In Character. Key into that item whatever character youíd like to display instead of the participantís ID number when they key their number in.

    If you entered a "Z", then for every character participants enter in as their ID, the letter "Z" appears instead. The computer recognizes the actual keys entered, but displays Zís.

    The most commonly used character in this case is the "#", but you can use any character you want.



What if participants realize that entering all 9's exits the Log In program?

  1. Click Set Up from the Main Menu


  2. Click Log In Set Up tab


  3. Change the Exit ID to whatever set of numbers you want to use to exit Log In. Be sure this new Exit ID is:
    • Something you can remember
    • Something that would never be a valid ID number

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Does it matter in what order the fitness tests are given?

Yes. You should be sure that when a participant takes a test that the activity involved in that test does not affect the results of the next test.

As an example, you donít want to take someoneís blood pressure or resting pulse, right after theyíve done the step test, sit ups per minute or max lift tests. All of those affect the members pulse and blood pressure and would result in invalid data.

Likewise, you wouldnít have a participant do the step test right after doing the max lift leg press, since the participantís legs would be fatigued and would affect the results of the step test.

Do all your static measures first: These can be done in any order. Blood pressure is often done first. If a personís blood pressure indicates they are at risk, you can avoid any additional testing for that participant and advise them that they must see a doctor and get written clearance from their doctor prior to continuing the fitness testing and working out in the center.

  • Static Tests
  • Resting Pulse
  • Height
 
  • Blood pressure
  • Weight
  • Girth Measures (Waist, hips thigh)
Dynamic Tests

There is no specific, Ďbestí order to do these tests in. Try to alternate tests that use the same major muscle groups. Also try to provide some rest between each test. If you are testing in small groups at the same test station, most participants should be able to get enough rest between tests while waiting their turn.

  1. Step Test
  2. Bench Press - One RM
  3. Leg Press - One RM
  4. Sit Ups Per Minute


Do the fitness tests have to be defined in the software in the same order as the tests are given?

No. The orders can be different. But for ease of data entry itís most convenient if the order in which test items are listed on the form that participants fill in with their responses, is in the same order as the items on the Fitness Tests form in the software.

Since you define your own test items for the software, you can arrange them in the software to display on the Fitness Tests Form screen to match whatever order you have them on your test form that participants fill in.


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© Red Canyon Systems, Inc. - August, 2001. All rights reserved.

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